Water colour painting ‘Plein Air’ session

I had read that a group of local water colour artists were going to be by the windmill in Port Louis harbour and you could observe what and how they were painting.

Being a supporter of the arts, I was keen to go. About ten artists were there, quietly going about their work.

The old windmill is not often seen by people who visit the docks as it is on the other side of the main harbour, the working side. The mill and surrounding buildings were good subjects to paint.

The brushes, paints and accessories seemed very similar to those that I have seen before, maybe the sun tans on the artists were a little bit deeper! No cheese or wine to be seen anywhere, only bottles of water.

All the artists were very approachable and happy to discuss their subject and painting methods.

I talked to Riaz Auladin and discovered he is the President of the International Watercolour Society in Mauritius.

He told me that the Society often has days painting outdoors in the ‘open air’.

It was not the sunniest of days but still a warm one. Difficult to flood the paper with water before painting.

Riaz was interested to hear about the Savages, a Bristol, England, based society of members interested in painting, drawing, music and performing arts as well as supporting and enjoying the exceptional talents of their fellow members.

The old buildings at the back of the windmill were a popular subject.

The painting finished, it was now time to dry the brushes.

Only two artists were at the dockside, sheltered from the sun under the watchful eye of customs officers and the occasional passers-by.

Tyre-ink work?

A tug that manoeuvres some of the freight ships in the busy port.

Some detail being applied to the image of the multiple flour mills on the other side of the harbour.

Perhaps this was the view that would have been taken by Frank Shipsides, a famous maritime painter.

I think this painter forgot to pack his things up before leaving for home!

Thank you to all the artists for their conversation and for displaying their work. Everyone who stopped to chat were really interested.

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Salt Pans at Tamarin

This is sadly the last place in Mauritius that salt is produced using traditional methods that have not changed in over 200 years.

The gates are often locked but if you go early in summer you can ask to go in and look around, children seem especially curious about how salt is made.

Sea water is pumped directly from the lagoon into large black cobblestone ‘pans’ and simply left to evaporate.

Collection of the salt mainly happens in the hot, dry summer periods as when it rains, well, it is back to square one or pan one!

It takes a couple of days for the water to evaporate and crystals to form.

It could be like walking on ice, frost or frozen snow.

The more delicate ‘Fleur de sel’ (rich in magnesium) is gathered from the surface water in a ‘lousse’ and larger crystals of rock salt from the bottom of the pans.

Salt used to be put into wicker baskets and left out to dry but these have now been replaced by plastic ones with drainage holes.

These ladies must be the fittest in Tamarin.

Harvested salt is now left to dry indoors in the rock building prior to bagging and despatch.

Natural as well as flavoured salts are available to buy in selected stores around the island.

The salt pans are an important part of the history and culture of Mauritius, it is sad to see them gradually being replaced by luxury property development and cheaper imports of salt. It is of great interest to visitors on the island as is obvious by the number of people stopping to photograph and discover how salt used to be harvested.

Hans Nayna Time Flies and it does!

 

Eighteen months ago I was recommended to go and see Hans and his band in concert. Its a mixture of blues, soul and bit of rock and refreshingly memorable. I have been to a few of his concerts since then and have really enjoyed his music whilst sharing it with others.

I regularly play the first album, ‘Music For The Soul’;  it’s warm, soulful and has a real feel-good factor. It is music from Mauritius but it is not Mauritian music, it is music created and played by super talented musicians.

The concert was easy to get to at l’Espace Culturel Malcom de Chazal, a new venue in Moka with a large and free car park (almost unheard of in Europe). Copies of the new CD, recorded and mixed on the island by Richard Hein, were on sale outside.

This was Hans on ‘top’ form with his seven piece band excellently supporting him and they looked like they were having real fun playing their new music to the audience. The music is not too different from the first album just a bit tighter and maybe highlighting his fabulous voice.

Time Flies, the signature track and first on the album, starts in reflective mood on the past, gentle piano and mournful strings gradually building pace and becoming more upbeat as the lyrics are repeated and the drums and pace lift the song into an easily repeated chorus which the audience soon joined in with.

Masquerade is all about being yourself, no faking, who you want to be and goes from deeply thoughtful to an uplifting song which has you dancing away and to uncontrollably sing the African style chant along with. “..it’s a show”, he sang. No, it’s a concert!! A great song to wake up to with sleepy eyes.

He has given us Music for the Soul and now a Lullaby for Saul. Hans became a father earlier in the year and life has changed for ever for him based on the lyrics of this song as Mummy and Daddy are now stealing the moon and the clouds for their baby. What good parent would not?

Water was my favourite on the night. An un-keep-still-able song paying homage to a brown eyed woman with a blue dress, red lips dancing away, with soul catching moves. A fabulously tight song, great bass, wind and drums, which had everyone in the room smiling and lifted. This one did not slip through my hands.

I had heard one song before, Plastic World, as this was on his last tour, and the lyrics probably explained why the CD was packaged in an innovative cardboard folder that presented the disc to you on opening.

The lyrics of his songs always come across as very meaningful and serious, telling a story amongst best friends or lovers.

A surprise was in store with an interruption from Myckee, a popular local rap artist. Hans was enraptured performing  with him on ‘What we need’, well what Myckee needs is spelling lessons perhaps?

Oh No! The concert is over! That went quickly. Time flies. Time to go home. Wait, they are back on stage.

All the songs were in English except for ‘Mo Lam’ from the first album, which was a very, very popular encore.

It was terrific. Hans gave it everything as usual, his voice is special and he belts out the lyrics at times holding nothing back.

Thanks to Hans, his band and all the support team who put on a truly memorable concert.  Let’s hope time flies before the next album.

Photography exhibition at Caudan

Caudan waterfront in Port Louis has an outdoor exhibition of some wonderful photographs from around the island to celebrate 50 years of independence for Mauritius in 2018.

This is a selection of photographs I have taken of the excellent ones taken by talented local photographers.

Watching a sunset after a day on the beach is what many people do at the weekend and sunsets here are spectacular.

Sometimes, the sea just looks like it is on fire.

I am learning how to take better photographs in different lighting conditions; this is a tremendous one.

Some local “Sega” dancers performing on the beach.

The different colour sands at Chamarel can be seen clearly here.

Many of the public beaches are busy with local families at the weekend, most preferring to enjoy their time protected from the sun by the shade from the trees whilst mad dogs (of which there are many) and Englishmen (of which there are few) lay out in the midday sun … and get burnt!

The lagoon is teeming with fish and all you need is a hook, some nylon thread, a stick and a little patience to catch your supper.

Only one black and white photo and it is a great one.

Local ice cream vans are busy at public beaches especially during public holidays and weekends. There are only two songs they play though, “The Teddy Bears’ Picnic” or “Greensleeves”. It just seems out of place!

Kite surfing at Le Morne, one of the best places in the world to do this.

An extraordinary photo of Pieter Both mountain, easily identified by the boulder seemingly perched precariously on the top…. but I can see an elephant ….

The deer are on red alert when anyone comes close … especially in the hunting season.

Some of the photographs show the wonderful life under the turquoise lagoon and on the reef that surrounds the island.

A very clever photo of a diver under Crystal Rock, close to the beach at Le Morne.

Just look at the colours of these ‘Blotcheye Soldier’ fish!

An ‘Indian Lion’ fish seen during a diving session at Flic en Flac.

Exploring at the “Cathedral” dive site, also at Flic en Flac.

A local bus hurrying through the cane fields, recently cut in the foreground, waiting to be cut in the background.

A view of Gunners’ Point at Grand Baie with a flamboyant tree in the foreground.

One of the many colourful birds at Casela Park on the West Coast.

The turtles at Casela move surprisingly fast especially if you offer them something to eat.

And finally, Pieter Both mountain in the background seen from fields of sugar cane with their beautiful flowers bending in the breeze like snow laden Christmas trees.

I go to this outdoor exhibition every time I visit Caudan and enjoy the inspirational photographs.

There will be more of my photographs soon!

Divali – The Hindu Festival of Light

For Hindus across Mauritius, and the world, Divali, the most popular religious festival. The name comes from the Sanskrit word deepavali, meaning “rows of lamps that are lit”.

To celebrate Divali, people set off fireworks and light small, clay lamps called divas. This is the traditional way.

It is called The Festival of Light because because Divali marks the triumph of light over darkness and good over evil.

People take time to decorate their homes, doorways and courtyards with lights and candles, make sweets and savouries.

Extra supplies of candles and especially firecrackers were on sale on the streets.

Electric lights have added a new dimension.

This building was very tastefully lit.

Restaurants, offices and even some small factories were decorated and spectacular from a distance.

This restaurant only serves light meals.

Moving my camera around whilst taking some photos of the lights gave way to some creative and colourful images.

Colleagues were very kind and thoughtful to me, giving me some tasty treats to eat.

This is one of many friendly, happy, enjoyable and well supported religious festivals on the island of Mauritius.